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ISDS [25 Sep 2016|08:16pm]

artis
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M4-mlGRPmkU
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[25 Sep 2016|12:47am]

artis
"there are even endings to denote whether or not a woman is married – thus, were the current president of Lithuania, Dalia Grybauskaitė, to marry, she would have to become Dalia Grybauskienė"

https://deepbaltic.com/2016/09/23/why-you-will-almost-definitely-have-to-change-your-name-when-speaking-latvian/
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China and the U.S. Are Long-term Enemies [25 Sep 2016|12:16am]

artis
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=kd-1LymXXX0
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Lembergs interpretē skaitļus :D [21 Sep 2016|04:48pm]

artis
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vbTLZDAe2BI
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De Gaulle - a French patriot [21 Sep 2016|12:43am]

artis
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j58gikUjyIo
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ГРУ [20 Sep 2016|11:18pm]

artis
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0tpTo3OCwbw
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[19 Sep 2016|04:13pm]

artis
Regarding technology, instead of it being subservient to humanity, "human beings have to adapt to it, and accept total change."[29] As an example, Ellul offered the diminished value of the humanities to a technological society. As people begin to question the value of learning ancient languages and history, they question those things which, on the surface, do little to advance their financial and technical state. According to Ellul, this misplaced emphasis is one of the problems with modern education, as it produces a situation in which immense stress is placed on information in our schools. The focus in those schools is to prepare young people to enter the world of information, to be able to work with computers but knowing only their reasoning, their language, their combinations, and the connections between them. This movement is invading the whole intellectual domain and also that of conscience.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jacques_Ellul
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[19 Sep 2016|09:08am]

artis
"Reptilian brain (Trust nothing) -> Mammalian brain (Trust family) -> Primate brain (Trust clan) -> Human brain (Trust all those who may help)

High trust societies are much more efficient because we don't all have to (metaphorically) squat in the dirt guarding our meat. This frees humans up to divide labor efficiently, spend time on higher order problems, etc.

What it is that leads to high trust societies (cultural homogeneity, common religious convictions) however, is an unpopular area of studies.

This also explains why otherwise highly educated people fall for advance-fee fraud scams--it's not just greed. Implicit trust in others is what has made them successful in the first place."
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[18 Sep 2016|02:07pm]

artis
"Like many other people who speak more than one language, I often have the sense that I’m a slightly different person in each of my languages—more assertive in English, more relaxed in French, more sentimental in Czech."

http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/how-morality-changes-in-a-foreign-language/
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[15 Sep 2016|07:56pm]

artis
Lielajá cibas chatá ir aizmirsies, ka anababtisti amiši jau ir dzívs piemérs tam, ká jús dzívotu.

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[14 Sep 2016|10:27am]

artis
"In Switzerland we never got NHL games on TV. It was all about EHC Chur, our local team. My favorite player growing up was Harijs Vītoliņš. He was a big, strong center for Chur in the ’90s."

http://www.theplayerstribune.com/nino-niederreiter-wild-hockey-switzerland/
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[14 Sep 2016|09:27am]

artis
So much for everyone being "equal"

“The kids who test in the top 1% tend to become our eminent scientists and academics, our Fortune 500 CEOs and federal judges, senators and billionaires”

http://www.nature.com/news/how-to-raise-a-genius-lessons-from-a-45-year-study-of-super-smart-children-1.20537

"In Europe, support for research and educational programmes for gifted children has ebbed, as the focus has moved more towards inclusion."
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[13 Sep 2016|12:10pm]

artis
"Freedom is on the other side of discipline"
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How the Sugar Industry Shifted Blame to Fat [12 Sep 2016|09:34pm]

artis
New York Times:

The documents show that a trade group called the Sugar Research Foundation, known today as the Sugar Association, paid three Harvard scientists the equivalent of about $50,000 in today’s dollars to publish a 1967 review of sugar, fat and heart research. The studies used in the review were handpicked by the sugar group, and the article, which was published in the prestigious New England Journal of Medicine, minimized the link between sugar and heart health and cast aspersions on the role of saturated fat."

[info]mindbound, [info]ctulhu un citiem adeptiem: go read David Hume.

It took almost 50 years to starting to debunk health issues created by Sugar. It took decades to accept the health issues created by Lead and Asbestos.

Of course this happened. Duh. It's still happening today. I'm not saying where because I don't know where. But if you do the simple math about how many people are working as scientists, it's not hard to figure out that there are companies who could benefit from positive scientific findings--no matter how wrong--and realize that some of what we're reading in original research was paid for and not really true.

I wish people would keep that in mind when they get all worshippy about science being self-correcting and a great system.

It's not a particularly great system if you are looking, for example, for certainty. If you want absolute certainty, a good dose of syllogistic reasoning will serve you better than any inductive method.

The problem is that syllogistic methods break down very quickly in real world applications because you have to find ways of classifying all the objects that may or may not fall into your category of "all", "some", or "none".

The scientific method is not a bad method, but it's not great. And it's weak in ways like this. It is not even close to the best method. But it's the only one we've found that's generally applicable to the human endeavor.

That's all it is. Better at being more general. I wish we'd get over ourselves and be honest about that.
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